010 Erasers and Removing Mistakes

In this episode, hosts John and Lisa discuss different options for removing mistakes and their favorite erasers for CP.

What is an eraser? And where did they come from?  

Erasers, and quite literally “rubbers” were not invented for colored pencils.  It’s an important thing to keep in mind.  

So Colored Pencil artists have come up with ways to adapt and use some of these tools and have come up with other methods to remove pigment. Colored pencil fine art is more closely associated with a painting medium like watercolor where you employ methods of protecting areas and planning a piece before hand.  

With colored pencil, there is generally not a good and sure way to erase without leaving behind some color.  Colored pencil artists refer to this as “ghosting”.  

Some of the erasers that are mentioned in the show:  

Sticky tack - Acid free, poster tack that is used to hang lightweight posters and pictures.  

Kneaded eraser - a bendable gum base that is pliable and can be used a long time

Magic tape -  use a pencil on the back of the tape to gently press into the paper and then lift off very carefully.  And you’ll find that pigment can come off quite nicely using this method.

Faber-Castell Knetgummi Art Eraser - This particular substance is very tacky and is used like the kneaded eraser or sticky tack.

Tombow MONO Zero - Good for erasing just a very small or sharp edged area.

Staedtler electric battery eraser - Good for a very small area or a stubborn area.

Protecting areas

I think that protection is the key for doing a colored pencil painting.  That pigment can stain the fibers of your surface and then it is difficult to remove.  Especially if you’re trying to remove darker pigment from an area that you want to be lighter. That is just next to impossible.  So the best thing to do with that is to plan very well and to protect those areas before you start.

Some tools for this are:

post it notes - these work well to protect areas.  

masking fluid / liquid frisket - Usually I use this method with a ruling pen (or you can use a paint brush) that works quite nicely.  You have to also be very aware of how fresh your masking fluid is of use masking fluid before that was getting old and it can tear the paper when you’re attempting to remove it.

Low tac artist tape - another method.

If you press very hard you usually limit yourself in terms of how much you’re able to remove.  But on the other hand if you press very lightly and use very deliberate smaller strokes sometimes those can be taken off quite easily even if your are using darker colors.

How are erasers made?

http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Eraser.html